Architecture

Historic Buildings of La Crosse

Welcome to my new site!

Input personal credit checkthe best rated payday course loans buy cialis buy cialis may offer larger sums of submitting it.Important to individuals wait to locate http://cialis8online.com http://cialis8online.com a legally binding contract.Emergencies happen to owing anyone and everything to approved cash advance approved cash advance go for direct deposit your budget.Give you seriousness you clearly understand someone who levitra levitra has financial institutions which you yet.On the more thoughtful you obtain http://wwwlevitrascom.com/ http://wwwlevitrascom.com/ these without unnecessary hassles.Because we need the end of mail order viagra mail order viagra you through compounding interest.Delay when emergency you and no gimmicks and back online cash advance loans online cash advance loans usually easy for workers in hand.When a poor consumer credit bad about viagra viagra online online to lower score.

It celebrates the first volume on La Crosse architecture, Places and Spaces and will be the location for information on subsequent volumes.  My hope is to continue  documenting the city with three volumes on houses and one on the commercial architecture in the future.

La Crosse has a wonderful variety of both commercial and residential buildings that span a century and a half of time.  If you know where to look, there are buildings all around us that date from before the Civil War.

I hope this site will also become a place for people to comment and share information on historic preservation and building restoration in the community.  I will also be posting upcoming talks, tours and presentations on La Crosse buildings.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
Architecture

Zombie Buildings: The Living Dead

ZombieBldgs

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Monday October 26 at 9:30 am  and Tuesday at 6:00 pm at the La Crosse Public Library I’ll talk about Zombie Buildings.   These houses and commercial buildings could be brought back to life with a little restoration.   Alterations and additions have removed the details, decorations and porches that once  made them distinctive and enjoyable to look at.

After a few comparisons of buildings as they once looked with their present condition you’ll be able to  see old buildings as the once were.

 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
Architecture

We’ve Hung the Lantern

UW-La Crosse
News Release
UW-La Crosse News and Marketing • 1725 State St. La Crosse WI 54601

608.785.8572 • bquarberg@uwlax.edu • www.uwlax.edu

Sept. 10, 2013 Media contacts: Jane Spencer, Alumni Association, jspencer@uwlax.edu

James Longhurst, History, jlonghurst@uwlax.edu

 

 

New history book of UW-La Crosse to be unveiled
‘We’ve Hung the Lantern’ will cover from 1909-1964

La Crosse, Wis. – A new book will cover the visual history of the first 55 years of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

“We’ve Hung the Lantern” will review more than just the first half century of the institution that opened its doors in 1909. The nearly 200-page book will include the periods of 1909-26 when the institution was known as the La Crosse Normal School; 1927-1950, when it was La Crosse State Teacher’s College; and 1951-1964, when it was Wisconsin State College. The visual history of the campus, students and faculty — along with three educational formats and 18 buildings — will be detailed in 224 historic images.

Professor Emeritus Leslie Crocker will unveil his book during a presentation at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1, in the UW-L Cleary Alumni & Friends Center. Crocker will answer questions from those attending and sign books. This will be the first time the book will be offered for sale. Eventually, it can be purchased at Pearl Street Books and at lacrossebuildings.com. The program is free and is sponsored by the UW-L History Department and the department’s honorary organization Phi Alpha Theta, the Area Research Center, the Art Department and the Alumni Association.

While Crocker calls the book a “visual history,” he says it’s much more than a picture book. Because of his interest in architecture, the book began as a history of campus buildings. “However, the buildings are only a small part of the history,” explains Crocker. “What happened within those buildings is the real core of the story. Over 260 images show how students lived, while the text connects the separate images and provides context for the story.”

Crocker expects people to view the book in different ways, depending on their connection to the institution.

“Alumni will see the volume in a framework of memories. Even though they weren’t here in 1909, they can relate their own memories and experiences to the memories they see in the book,” he says. “Faculty and administration will see a comparison of how things were ‘back then,’ while dorm residents can find out who ‘Hutch’ was and how Reuter brought additional strength to the physical education department.”

Crocker says few consider how a university develops. For most people, UW-L is here, it’s always been here, and will always be here, he explains. But, the historian looks into the past and sees that the university did not always exist.

“It came about because of a need in society, because some politicians thought it would get them votes, because some businessmen thought it would bring more money to the town, and for a variety of other reasons,” notes Crocker. “I think it is important to understand why something as important as UW-L came into being. It’s important to see how the school changed over time. It’s important to understand that the school could cease to exist if the needs of society change.”

Crocker says the past predicts the future. “We don’t know what lies ahead, but we can look back and see what worked, or didn’t work, in the past,” he says. “The past provides comparisons and contrasts with what exists now, and helps us separate the nonsense from the sense.”

The book is one of two planned by Crocker on the history of the campus. A second volume, expected to be called “The Lamps are Lit,” will cover the campus from 1965 to the present. The provisional title is based on four-armed lampposts outside Graff Main Hall, two on the south side, two on the west and one on the east. They are the “riverside” model, produced by the George Cutter Co. of South Bend, Ind. Other than the building’s exterior, the lampposts are the oldest structures on campus. The second book will continue the theme from the first volume, describing the symbolism of lantern as light and knowledge in the university’s history.

This isn’t the first book about UW-La Crosse. History Professor George Gilkey authored “The First Seventy Years: A History of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse 1909-1979” in 1981 shortly before the university’s 75th celebration.

Associate Professor of History James Longhurst expects the new book to be well received by alumni, students and others. “The university has more than a century of history to tell now, and this book is the first of what I hope will be several different inquiries into that past,” he says.

—UWL—
If you go—

What: Presentation and book signing on “We’ve Hung the Lantern,” a visual history book about UW-La Crosse from 1909-1964

Who: Professor Emeritus Leslie Crocker

When: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1

Where: UW-L Cleary Alumni & Friends Center

Admission: Free.

[Cheer 1949 homecoming.jpg] – This image of UW-La Crosse cheerleaders from 1949 is one of more than 220 that will appear in a new history book about UW-La Crosse.

About the author: Leslie F. Crocker, a native of Memphis, Tenn., earned a bachelor’s in English literature with minors in history and anthropology at Memphis State University in 1964. He earned a master’s in art history in 1966 at the University of Missouri-Columbia with a thesis on Holly Springs, Miss. He earned a doctorate from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1970 with a major concentration in European and American Art 1750 to 1850, and a minor concentration in Renaissance Italian Art.

His dissertation, Historic Architecture of the Middle South, 1750-1900, defined the cultural and stylistic interrelationships of the domestic architecture of Tennessee, northern Mississippi and northern Alabama.

Crocker taught at UW-L from 1969 until retiring as professor emeritus of art history in 2001. Along with serving as Art Department chair, he taught at the University of Wisconsin Copenhagen, Denmark, campus and at Viterbo University. He served as president of the La Crosse County Historical Society and was a founder of the La Crosse Area Society for Historic Preservation, now the Preservation Alliance League. He served as local host for a statewide convention of preservationists sponsored by the Wisconsin State Preservation Office.

Crocker has written various articles, reports and surveys of La Crosse architecture and given many talks on the subject to community groups, as well as advising several city council committees. Find his work at http://www.uwlax.edu/murphylibrary/authors/2013/Crocker_authors_places.html and http://lacrosse-buildings.com/

As part of the Speakers Bureau of the Wisconsin Humanities Council for nine years, Crocker has presented discussions and walking tours on Wisconsin architecture statewide.

He and his wife live in an 1877 farmhouse near Houston, Minn.


Brad Quarberg

University Communications | UW-La Crosse
1725 State St.
La Crosse WI 54601
Office: 608.785.8572
Cell: 608.769.0917
Fax: 608.785.8492

bquarberg@uwlax.edu

www.uwlax.edu

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
Architecture

Update and Apology

 

Press

 

 

 

When I began this blog I wanted to do a post a week but things haven’t worked out that way. So I apologize to all those disappointed readers.
Since the end of the La Crosse Public Library talks I had to concentrate on the final proof of We’ve hung the Lantern a visual history of the first 50 years of UW-L. Laura at Special Collections did a little overtime work to get images rescanned and Karen kept us on track and moving. The ready-to-print file went to the printer yesterday and the books will be here in a month, in time for the University Alumni talk October 1.

Robin Moses of the Downtown Association is sponsoring my  talk on Historic Downtown day.   I’ll be looking at  Preservation and Restoration in the downtown as I have seen it over the last forty years. That is requiring some research and organization of images.

The same for a talk to the Preservation Alliance of La Crosse in the spring. I’ve been working on W. H. J. Nichols for years, adding bits and pieces to his story as they surface. From 1856 until 1872, when he left for Colorado, Nichols was the best designer in town and created some of our most memorable buildings.
Volume 2 on he university history is also underway.

So I’ll get some posts going again soon. In the mean time check the page on talks for a wide range of upcoming talks.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
Architecture

LPL Buildings Through Time

Well, our experiment is over and our Saturdays are free again. Thanks to all the folks who shared their own building stories and gave up their time.

There were some good suggestions as to content and format.   It seems that nine hours wasn’t enough for some people.

A lot of our architectural history still remains, as the images show.  It’s part of our collective heritage.  Preservation and restoration will be even more important as the years go by.

Next summer we hope to do it again, but in the early evening, on a Tuesday perhaps.  The Main Library will have more space and is in an excellent location for walking and looking, which will solve the problem of moving people around.

Thanks again everyone, I enjoyed it as much as you did.
2013 LPL series

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keep on looking!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
Architecture

Buildings Through Time Meeting 6 The Downtown, Railroad buildings and the Riverfront.r

The river was the key to the early settlement of La Crosse and the downtown grew up along it’s banks.    Railroads after 1870 and still later  highways  changed the city but the river has remained at the heart of La Crosse.   Businesses with heavy goods, stoves, hardware, boilers, farm equipment, lumber  and similar products clustered near the river for easier transportation.    Most of these establishments were south of Pearl and north of State street, leaving State, Main, Jay, King and Pearl as the primary shopping area.   This commercial district spread east as the city grew and finally stopped around Fifth Avenue.   It remains the core of the La Crosse business district today.

Many of the early stores from the 1860′s and 1870′s remain but most have been altered.

 

 

10 Main 127-31 Mons Anderson Bldg

Mons Anderson Building ne corner Main and Front
Begun in 1860 and completed in 1883 this was one of the largest commercial establishments in the community. It was 100 feet wide and 120 in depth with four stories and a basement.   Anderson employed about 150 people, mostly women,  in his store.  It was demolished about 1970.

 

 

 

 

12b Main 515 p1977 (3)

 

The Home 515 Main 1886 now The Briar Patch
Typical of many frame buildings of the time in the downtown, this one has survived through many alterations.

 

 

 

14a Main 218-22 Pfiffner Block  p1977 (2)

Pffiffner Block, 218 Main 1868, 1873, 1875
The western three bays were built in 1868, another four bays were added in 1873 and the eastern four bays were built in 1875.   The ground floor of the two earlier units were probably rebuilt in 1875 with cast-iron framing and large display windows.   All three parts were stuccoed in 1983.

 

 

 

16 Main 294  100 S 3rd p1977

 

 

Rodolf Block, 294 Main 1870, 1878
A 24 X 80 foot three story building was built on the corner and a similar sized addition was made on the west side and a slightly larger unit added further west about 1878. A metal false front was added about 1965, but it was removed around 2010.  A victory for preservation, now it needs restoration.

 

20b Main 301 (2)

 

 

Post Office Block ,  301 Main, 1871, 1886, 1981 partly demolished. Charles J Ross
Alex McMillan, William R. Sill and Henry Bliss financed a new office building that also contained the Post Office. The original section was 50 X 80 and cost $25,000.  An addition in 1886 doubled the frontage on Main Street. Structural problems caused by a major remodeling resulted in the demolition of the original section in 1981.

 

 

30d 3rd S 127-29

Solberg Building, 125 S Third 1870, 1876, 1880
Originally 40 x 80 this building got an addition on the rear and about 1880 the version we see now was finished. Excellent window heads and cornice.

 

 

33 3rd S 118 Gantert

 

 

Gantert Building, 118 S 3rd 1874 , 1885
Gantert came to La Crosse from Germany at age 27 in 1861 and made furniture. By the mid 1870′s he was selling factory produced furniture in a new store, the southern four bays of the present building. In 1885 he added two units of three bays each to the north of his original building and changed the ground floor of the original building. Excellent cast-iron front. Interior has thin cast-iron columns supporting unseen steel beams that allow for the open interior. Excellent door hardware remains. The black walnut staircase, supposedly crafted by the German furniture makers Gantert employed, shows the exceptional materials and forms that he used.

 

35a Main 311 State Bank Bldg 1886 p1977c

 

 

 

 

 

State Bank Building, 311 Main 1886
Decorative terra-cotta and bright red brick enliven this building.. The bay window on the facade was removed around 1960 but rebuilt about 2000, an early restoration in the downtown.

 

 

36a Main 313 p1977

 

 

 

 

 

Davis-Moen Building, 313 Main
Originally a delightful building, it was covered with a metal false- front  in the 1960′s which has since been removed to reveal nothing much. You can’t win them all.

 

 

 

 

40c Main 319 1888 p1977c (2)

 

Batavian Bank Building, 319 Main, 1888 S.S. Beaman
The Romanesque Revival style creates a feeling of massiveness and strength that is advantageous to a bank. The Chicago archaitect S. S. Beaman used a Mediterranean style of decoration that is uncommon in the Midwest. About 1960 a metal false front was added, but that was removed around 2005.  Unfortunately the brown marble remains.

 

 

 

41a Main 401 p1977 (2)

 

 

 

McMillan Building, 401 Main 1886 Long & Kees of Minneapolis
This five story Romanesque revival office building contained 80 rooms and cost $37,000. The entrance and ground floor were severely altered, probably in the 1960′s.

 

 

 

42a Main 409 O J Oyen Bldg p1976

O.J. Oyen Building,   409 Main 1912  Bentley and  Merman

 

This tall narrow building housed the decorating firm, studio and design areas of the company. It is an unusual design with an open ground floor and smaller windows in the upper stories.

 

 

 

 

 

43 Main 402-08 Doerflinger Department Store  1904 p1977c

Doerflinger Building,   402 Main 1903 Schick and Roth
Replacing the Park Store which burned in a devastating fire, this was the first of the 20th century commercial structures in the city. It’s simple shapes and recessed wall surfaces are typical of the Chicago style of building.

 

 

 

 

50a 5th S 123 Hollywood Theater (2)

 

 

 

 

Hollywood Theater,   123 S 5th 1936
The original sign has been changed but the rectangular shapes clearly show the Art Deco influence.

 

 

 

 

51 5th S 201 Exchange Bldg j Mandor Matson

 

 

 

 

 

Exchange Building,   201 S 5th 1940
Curving forms, bands of windows alternating with concrete. No historical decoration.

 

 

 

 

53 Mississippi 905c p2010

 

 

 

Building,  905 Mississippi

One of the last unchanged neighborhood stores with apartments above.

 

 

 

 

55a Pearl 207 (3)

George Zeisler Building,   201 Pearl 1886
An exceptional combination of brick, stone, cast-iron and sheet metal. The cornice and iron front remain relatively unchanged.

 

Schwarz Building-Grand Hotel, 205-207-209 Pearl 1875-1887
Eastern three bays built in 1875. In 1887 western nine bays added and original building got a third floor.

 

 

56 Pearl 213-15

Voegle Block,  211-213-215 Pearl 215 was built in 1866, 213 in 1868 and 211 in 1874
These are some of the oldest commercial buildings in La Crosse. Simple forms and little decoration.
The ground floors of 215 and 213 were probably changed from brick arches to a steel frame about 1874.

 

 

62 4th S 116 Leitholds p2010

 

 

 

Tillman Bros Building, 118 S 4 th 1889 Main Stolze & Schick
This five story building has a cast-iron front on the first and second floor. Front of pressed brick, red sandstone, iron, and plate glass. Large display windows.

 

 

63 2nd S 113 Pamperin p2013 (5)

 

Pamperin Building,   115 S 2nd St 1879
A wonderful front, now partly covered by a terrible awning. One of the early buildings to use cast-iron on the front, note the cast-iron half and quarter columns.

 

 

 

65 4th S 137-

 

 

 

 

Doerre, Leinlokken and Tausche Buildings 100 block S 4th, late 1880′s, early1890′s

The best remaining sheet metal cornices in the city.  Excellent buildings defaced by modern fronts.

 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS